education

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Good morning. Here's the Tuesday Innovation Trail Mix

The DOT has been looking at the impact of fracking on NY roads and bridges and it's not pretty.

Health officials make the case for reinvesting $10 billion saved through Medicaid changes. 

Not everyone thinks the investment in the Adirondack watershed is a good idea.

Work finally starts on renovation of Rochester City schools five years after the funding approved.

clevercupcakes / via Flickr

Reading Rainbow is back - but not on TV.

Host LeVar Burton has revived the popular franchise, which ran for 26 years on PBS, as an app for tablets.

The medium may be different, but the mission is the same: promoting children's literature.

New York NOW traveled to one of the most remote parts of the Adirondack Park to tell the story of a rural school district that has been able to stave off closing its doors - by opening them to international students. 

Smaller districts like this one in Newcomb, N.Y. are now pushing for a new law that will allow foreign students to stay longer than the one year currently allowed. 

Watch the full story:

A rural school district in a remote corner of the Adirondack Park is a hotbed of internationalism.

This week, New York NOW travels to Newcomb, N.Y. to tell the story of how one school district has been able to stave off closing its doors - by opening them to international students.

Students from as far away as Spain and Brazil make up about half of the total number in most high school classes. Since the international students pay tuition, the tiny Newcomb Central School District is thriving.

Now a group of New York legislators is pushing for a new federal law that would allow foreign students to stay longer than the one year currently allowed.

See the entire story this weekend on your local PBS station.

Zack Seward / WXXI

It's 4 p.m. on a Thursday. And instead of sitting in front of office computer screens, a group of employees from M5 Networks is in the middle of band practice.

The ragtag four-piece - crammed into rented jam space in Rochester's High Falls district - is banging out Jet's "Are You Gonna Be My Girl?" as an instructor from the Hochstein School of Music looks on.

The banter is friendly, the thud of the kick drum is heavy, and the song is surprisingly well played.

There's only one rule for the M5 workers: you can't play an instrument you already know how to play.

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