Directions, weather reports, water bottles – those are some of the things we've seen robots giving out at the Pyeongchang Winter Olympics, helping to host thousands of visitors and media. They're also helping South Korea present itself as a tech-savvy nation with an eye on the future.

Most of the robots we've seen in Pyeongchang and Gangneung – the two areas where the Winter Games are being held – weren't made to look human. Instead, they present a wide range of looks — and autonomy.

In this week’s WXXI Business Report, Randy Gorbman talks about a Bloomberg report that says Tops Markets may be considering filing for bankruptcy.

We also hear about some changes for Wegmans in the Buffalo area and whether they might have any impact in Rochester, and a story about a big honor for an RIT alum.

In 1984, two men were thinking a lot about the Internet. One of them invented it. The other is an artist who would see its impact on society with uncanny prescience.

First is the man often called "the father of the Internet," Vint Cerf. Between the early 1970s and early '80s, he led a team of scientists supported by research from the Defense Department.

Initially, Cerf was trying to create an Internet through which scientists and academics from all over the world could share data and research.

The leader of the Laboratory for Laser Energetics at the University of Rochester will be in Washington on Tuesday meeting with Congressional leaders and others in an effort to make sure that lab is still funded in the next fiscal year.

In a statement on the lab’s website, Director Michael Campbell says that a paragraph buried in the federal budget details on the Department of Energy website states that the agency plans to “ramp down” federal support for the U of R lab over a three-year period.

It was a sweeter than usual Valentine’s Day for employees at LiDestri Food and Drink.

The Rochester based producer of food, beverages and spirits gave all of their 1,200 employees at each of their five U.S. facilities an extra full paycheck.

They were notified on Wednesday that their mid-month paycheck had been doubled, because of strong company performance and the recently approved federal tax legislation.

A technology start-up company with roots in Rochester and RIT is getting some help from New York State.

The company is called Token and it was founded last year by two RIT grads, Melanie and Steve Shapiro.

They make a special type of ring that you can wear as a device  that you would use to do everything from make mobile payments to enable ‘smart locks’ for your home or car.

Tired of annoying online ads? There could be some relief starting Thursday, if you're one of the vast majority of people who use Google Chrome as your default browser.

Google is launching a built-in blocker in Chrome that is designed to filter out ads it says repeatedly violate standards put out by the Coalition of Better Ads. Pop-up ads? Check. Auto-playing video ads? Yep. Large sticky ads? You know, the ones that stay on your screen even as you try to scroll past them. Those are on the blacklist, too.

Wegmans has again been named one of the FORTUNE Best Companies to Work For.

Wegmans ranked #2, same as last year. It has been on the list every year since the survey began 21 years ago

The list is based on survey responses from more than 310,000 employees rating their workplace culture on more than 50 different elements.

Victor-based Constellation Brands is announcing some changes in the executive ranks.

The company says that Bill Newlands has been promoted to president and chief operating officer.  Rob Sands, who previously held the title of president and chief executive officer will continue to serve as CEO.

Newlands, who has more than 30 years of experience in the beverage alcohol industry, joined Constellation in 2015 as an executive vice president and chief growth officer. Last year, he became Constellation’s chief operating officer.

Technology that uncovers the physical signs of domestic violence is the subject of a two year study at the University of Rochester.

ALS, short for alternative light source, detects bruising that isn't immediately visible to the naked eye.

"As soon as someone is injured, blood begins to pool below the top layer of the skin,” said John Cullen, assistant director of UR’s Susan B. Anthony Center. “This technology allows us to see that bruising immediately as it happens. Otherwise, you'd have to wait a couple of days before you could see it with the naked eye."

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U.S. Photonics Hub Coming To Rochester

What does this mean for the economy of the Rochester region?