What would happen if an unfriendly nation tried to take down the power grid, or the air traffic control system, or blow up a chemical plant with a cyberattack?

How would government agencies respond to such a threat?

That kind of war-gaming has been playing out this week in a windowless conference room at the Secret Service headquarters in Washington, D.C., in an exercise officials call "Cyber Storm VI."

The acting chief executive officer of Cambridge Analytica, the political data firm embroiled in controversy after improperly sharing data from some 87 million Facebook users, has stepped down. Alexander Tayler is the second CEO to step down since the scandal broke in March.

A statement on Cambridge Analytica's website says Tayler will resume his former position as chief data officer "in order to focus on the various technical investigations and inquiries."

A celebration of science will be held through a series of events in downtown Rochester Saturday.

This year’s March for Science stems from last year’s march by the same name that was a call to action to unite as a diverse, non-partisan group advocating for trust in the field.

Updated at 7:35 p.m. ET

Mark Zuckerberg faced dozens of senators — and the American television audience — to take "hard questions" on how Facebook has handled user data and faced efforts to subvert democracy.

"We didn't take a broad enough view of our responsibility, and that was a big mistake. It was my mistake, and I'm sorry," the co-founder and CEO of Facebook, uncharacteristically wearing a suit, said in his opening remarks. "I started Facebook, I run it, and I'm responsible for what happens here."

Facebook users have begun to see whether they're among the 87 million people whose information may have been compromised for use by a political research firm. For some, the news is good: "It doesn't appear your Facebook information was shared with Cambridge Analytica."

The notifications are appearing on Facebook's page about users' exposed data. The company had also said it would put the information at the top of users' news feed.

Eastman Kodak is announcing a change in the corporate ranks. The company says that John O’Grady has been named President for the Print Systems Division effective April 24.

O’Grady is currently President of the Consumer and Film Division and he is the former General Manager of World Wide Sales for Print Systems.

Virtual reality serves as pain relief alternative

Apr 9, 2018

For Moira Reeves, what helps keep the pain at bay is “Bear Blast.”

Amazon is coming to the Rochester area.

It’s not the company’s much touted ‘HQ2‘  which Rochester and Buffalo worked on together to make a bid for; officials already found out some weeks ago that won’t be happening.

But late Tuesday afternoon, Monroe County Executive Cheryl Dinolfo revealed that Amazon will be bringing one of its distribution centers to the Town of Henrietta. It will be located in a 70,000 square foot building on Clay Road.

Updated at 4:15 p.m. ET

The Dow Jones industrial average lost 459 points Monday, falling 1.9 percent, as tech stocks led the markets down and investors eyed growing trade tensions with China. Earlier in the day, the Dow was down more than 700 points.

Amazon tumbled more than 5 percent after President Trump criticized the company in tweets. The tech-heavy Nasdaq index lost 2.7 percent. The S&P 500 index lost 59 points, or 2.2 percent.

Several Papa John’s pizza shops in Rochester have abruptly closed their doors.

Various media reports indicate that a note posted on the doors of the local shops from Schuyler Lofberg, listed as ‘Sole Member,’ says that the local Papa John’s came to “an abrupt ending due to the heavy headwinds put upon us by New York State. We will not be the last to fall under this current business climate. I sincerely apologize to our loyal customers. They made this worth everything to me.”

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U.S. Photonics Hub Coming To Rochester

What does this mean for the economy of the Rochester region?