Jobs

Job creation, economic development, higher education, green jobs, and business incubator stories from across upstate New York.

CREDIT NATIONAL HUMAN TRAFFICKING RESOURCE CENTER

 

To the untrained eye, it might be hard to detect labor trafficking. Who are common victims and what does this act of illegal slave labor actually look like? There are victims of labor trafficking working in places we either visit or drive by on a regular basis: restaurants, factories, construction sites, farms, hotels and even homes.

WXXI News' Need to Know program has covered human trafficking in the past, but on this edition of the program, we’re focusing in on labor exploitation in the upstate region. 

New York politicians are raising concerns that the sale of medical device manufacturer Welch Allyn could put central New York jobs in jeopardy.

When Hill-Rom announced Wednesday morning that it is acquiring Welch Allyn, it did not say that any jobs would be eliminated at the Skaneateles Falls-based company. But that's what was immediately on the mind of the lawmakers who represent the central New York in Washington, D.C.

Sen. Charles Schumer (D-NY) told reporters Wednesday he had a “call in” to company representatives to find out more.

SASHA-ANN SIMONS/WXXI NEWS

Many families with children with autism describe leaving high school as a ‘falling off a cliff’ - because of the lack of services when they become adults. Add to that, a complicated and intimidating job hunt. Despite the obstacles that people with autism face trying to find work, a new, dedicated job fair in Rochester, New York may be the first step to help that community find employment.

(Video after the jump.)

Ellen Abbott

A new program starts in Syracuse this weekend that’s meant to help people overcome one of the biggest impediments to finding work in central New York: transportation. 

It often isn’t so easy getting a job in central New York if you don’t have a car or access to public transportation. Providence Services of Syracuse President Deborah Hundley says the problems come at workplaces that are beyond the bus line, or shifts that begin or end when buses aren’t running.

For more than a decade, undocumented Hispanic workers have been indispensable on dairy farms across Upstate New York. The immigrants live largely invisible lives and rarely stray off the farm to avoid detection by federal agents. They are also less likely to report abuses.

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