Job creation, economic development, higher education, green jobs, and business incubator stories from across upstate New York.

In an effort to tighten the middle-skills gap and change the way people think about manufacturing jobs, Kodak's Eastman Business Park opened its doors to hundreds of high school students for a show and tell Thursday.

People who work in the field and hiring managers from local manufacturing companies spoke to the students about taking advantage of future job openings in the area. Through videos and panel discussions, the teens got a glimpse of daily work duties, which classes and programs will help them to prepare, and compensation and benefits.

A recent study that ranks Syracuse number one in the country for concentrated poverty among blacks and Latinos has ignited activists, who want city government to do something about creating jobs for residents who live in poverty.

At a rally on the steps of Syracuse City Hall, Rev. Nebraska Carter, a vice president of the Urban Jobs Task Force, compared poverty to a cavity in a tooth.


Governor Cuomo has been making frequent trips to upstate cities this summer, touting his success in reviving the regions’ faltering economy. But a new report from the State Comptroller on job creation shows there is still some work to do.

Governor Cuomo was in Buffalo recently at a topping off ceremony for a giant solar factory on the site of an old   steel plant. State investment in the new plant is part of the governor’s Buffalo Billion initiative, and he claims it will create at least 3000 new jobs.




To the untrained eye, it might be hard to detect labor trafficking. Who are common victims and what does this act of illegal slave labor actually look like? There are victims of labor trafficking working in places we either visit or drive by on a regular basis: restaurants, factories, construction sites, farms, hotels and even homes.

WXXI News' Need to Know program has covered human trafficking in the past, but on this edition of the program, we’re focusing in on labor exploitation in the upstate region. 

New York politicians are raising concerns that the sale of medical device manufacturer Welch Allyn could put central New York jobs in jeopardy.

When Hill-Rom announced Wednesday morning that it is acquiring Welch Allyn, it did not say that any jobs would be eliminated at the Skaneateles Falls-based company. But that's what was immediately on the mind of the lawmakers who represent the central New York in Washington, D.C.

Sen. Charles Schumer (D-NY) told reporters Wednesday he had a “call in” to company representatives to find out more.