Energy

Hydrofracking, Marcellus Shale, wind power, solar power, nuclear power, and renewable energy stories from across upstate New York.

Oneonta residents split on NED pipeline proposal

Jul 17, 2015
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Federal regulators held a public hearing last night on a proposed natural gas pipeline that would run through several upstate New York counties. Energy company Kinder Morgan wants to build the Northeast Energy Direct Pipeline to funnel gas from Pennsylvania to the East Coast.

There are four compressor stations proposed for New York State along the pipeline route.

Over a hundred people attended the hearing in Oneonta and several gave passionate statements.

Group applies to frack with propane in New York

Jul 10, 2015
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A group of farm families in Tioga County wants a state permit for a natural gas well that uses gelled propane. It’s still fracking, but it would skirt the state’s ban.

The debate around fracking in New York State has been mostly about hydraulic fracturing: using large quantities of water mixed with chemicals to break up underground shale formations and release natural gas.

Though the DEC is finally planning to clear the contaminated soil at the former waterfront site of Bethlehem Steel in Lackawanna, Erie County Legislator Lynne Dixon believes a better plan should be developed.

Seneca Lake protesters soldier on

Jul 6, 2015

Every few weeks since last fall, groups of protesters have been blocking access to a work site on Seneca Lake, the largest of the Finger Lakes. They want to stop plans to store natural gas, as well as propane and butane, in the emptied-out salt caverns alongside the lake.

New York Department of Environmental Conservation Commissioner Joe Martens announced this week that he is leaving that position, just two days after he issued the final environmental impact statement banning hydrofracking in the state.  The final report on fracking is a signal for others to move on as well. Anti-fracking groups say they are using New York’s stance to help convince other states -- and even countries -- to also ban the gas drilling process.

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