Randy Gorbman

Randy Gorbman is WXXI's Director of News and Public Affairs. Randy manages the day-to-day operations of WXXI News on radio, television, and online. 

Randy has over 30 years of broadcast news experience, and was recently news director at WHAM-AM in Rochester. Randy has also been news director, writer, announcer, and producer at radio stations in several cities in New York and Connecticut, as well as working as an editor at the NBC Radio Network. He served as past president of the New York State Associated Press Broadcasters' Association, and is currently a member of its Board of Directors.

Randy has also taught journalism to local students, serving as adjunct instructor at SUNY Geneseo and Monroe Community College.

Randy received his Bachelor of Arts degree in Communication from the S. I. Newhouse School of Public Communications at Syracuse University, and his Master's degree in Liberal Arts from SUNY Empire State College.

Kodak expects its revenue for 2015 to come in at or near the low end of its earlier guidance of between $1.8 billion and $2 billion.


RIT has named a former Kodak executive to be the new director of  the New York Pollution Prevention Institute.

Two area utilities have been using drones to help conduct some routine inspections of their facilities.

(WXXI News & AP) Both Governor Andrew Cuomo and Senator Chuck Schumer have announced an agreement to save at-risk jobs  at three Kraft-Heinz facilities in Upstate NY that employ nearly 1,000 people. 

That includes about 400 workers at the plant in Avon which makes Cool Whip and Lunchables, and the plant in Campbell in Steuben County that makes string cheese among other products  and employs nearly 400.

CREDIT KRENZER FARMS

 

Farming is still big business in New  York State. That’s the upshot of a report just released by the NYS  Comptroller.

Comptroller Thomas DiNapoli says that agriculture contributed $37.6 billion to the state's economy in 2012, an increase of more than 22 percent over a five year period. 

DiNapoli says it’s not just the traditional grain and vegetable crops that are contributing to that bottom line.

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