Michelle Faust

Michelle Faust, MA, joined WXXI News as a Reporter/ Producer in February 2014. She came from KAWC Colorado River Public Media, where she was Morning Edition Host and Spanish Language Producer. Michelle is an enthusiastic follower of news and a long-time aficionado of public broadcasting.

Michelle had press credentials before she had a driver's license, working for newspapers in both high school and college. She earned her Bachelor of Arts in Journalism and Romance Languages in 2002 from the University of Oregon. 

Michelle infuses curiosity and a passion for knowledge into her work. Her previous career in education began in 2002 when she taught English in Nîmes, France, before returning to the University of Oregon for her Master of Arts in Spanish literature. Her career in education culminated with a position as Spanish Professor for Arizona Western College.

Michelle loves travel, languages, nature, and adventure. In her off time, she spends most of her time traveling, reading, studying languages, dancing, doing yoga, and spending time in the outdoors hiking or kayaking.

Ways to Connect

Andrew Burton/Getty

The federal government wants to curb the number of deaths from opioid drug overdoses. The U.S. Department of Health and Human Services (HHS) hopes to make in-roads by funding intervention and prevention.

HHS Secretary Silvia Burwell recently announced initiatives that target heroin and opioid deaths and dependence across the country. 133 million dollars has been allocated to programs for treatment and education.

Photo: Office of Gov. Cuomo

 

Governor Andrew Cuomo accepted an award from the Ibero-American Action League in Rochester this week.

The community organization hosted the Upstate Latino Summit, an annual event that kicks off Hispanic Heritage Month and works on promoting Latino interests in New York State. The governor used the opportunity to denounce anti-immigrant rhetoric from some Republicans.

nystateofhealth

 

The Executive Director of the New York State of Health Marketplace says the state has managed to get more of the Latino community enrolled. 

A recent report by the state health insurance exchange shows a four percent increase in the number of Latinos who’ve signed up for coverage since 2014.

Since the end of the 2015 open enrollment, 25 percent of those insured self-identified as Latino.

Donna Frescatore, executive director of the state exchange,  says it’s related to a concerted effort in the states Latino communities.

"We introduced a new Spanish online application that we’re getting great feedback on. And it’s getting a good deal of use; we want to continue to expand that. And also, we’re present at many cultural events throughout the state in Latino communities," says Frescatore.

 

Michelle Faust/WXXI News

Deaths from drug overdose have outpaced automobile accidents as the leading cause of injury in 35 states, including New York. But the state is making strides to curtail that trend. Physicians are integral to treating addiction, but the country has a shortage of doctors with training in the specialty.

www.newlabor.org

Over two million American workers are exposed to silica dust in industries like construction, mining, road repair and sand blasting. WXXI’s Michelle Faust reports the Occupational Safety and Health Administration - OSHA - is now pushing for tougher limits on how much silica dust they can be exposed to in the workplace. But the proposed rules will come too late for many workers who’ve already contracted the potentially fatal lung disease, silicosis. 


Pages