Updated at 3:27 p.m. ET

After a brief security evacuation, U.S. telecom regulators have voted to repeal so-called net neutrality rules, which restrict the power of Internet service providers to influence loading speeds for specific websites or apps.

After weeks of heated controversy and protests, the Republican majority of the Federal Communications Commission voted along party lines on Thursday to loosen Obama-era regulations for Internet providers.

(WXXI News & AP) Communities in New York state are splitting $755 million in state economic development funding.

State officials announced the awards Wednesday at an event in Albany. The money will support hundreds of local economic development efforts, including job training, subsidies for expanding businesses and funding for community organizations.

This year's big winners include central New York, the Mohawk Valley, the Albany region, the mid-Hudson Valley and Long Island, which each received more than $80 million.

RIT officials say an alum of the university has just given them $50 million, the largest donation ever made to that institution.

Austin McChord is a 32 year old, 2009 graduate of RIT, who started a company called Datto. That’s a Connecticut-based data protection company that also employs about 200 people in downtown Rochester.

McChord is also an RIT trustee, and he says he started his company in 2007 with an idea he had while he was a student.

After seeing his grandmother burn herself on a toaster, Andrew Young had an idea. It led to an invention - the "Toaster Shooter." It's now a $250,000 winner.

14-year-old Andrew Young from Batavia was announced as the winner of the Frito-Lay "Dreamvention" contest for his toaster that shoots toast into the air and onto your plate. Young beat out four other teen inventors from across the country.

The toaster is tilted to the side and has bigger springs, so when your toast is done it shoots into the air and falls onto your plate.

There may be some big changes on the way for Xerox’s Board of Directors.

The word came early Monday with Xerox announcing that Jonathan Christodoro, a board member who was originally appointed by activist investor Carl Icahn, is resigning. Christodoro is making that move so that he can join a slate of three other Icahn-backed nominees to run for the Xerox board next year.

The latest Paychex-IHS Small Business Employment Watch is out; we talk about the changes in job growth and wage growth in the November survey.

We also talk about some changes for the Xerox Board of Directors; One director, who has worked with activist investor Carl Icahn is resigning, but he and three others will seek to join the board next year.

And there are corporate changes for a local high-tech company, iCardiac Technologies.

On their first day of trading, bitcoin futures surged past $18,000, adding to a streak for the digital currency that began the year at just $1,000 and has nearly tripled in value over the past month alone.

Reuters reports that bitcoin futures, traded through the Chicago Board Options Exchange (CBOE), saw January contracts, which opened at $15,460 in New York on Sunday evening, leap to a high of $17,170 during Asian hours.

Alstom Signaling, which makes communications equipment for the transportation sector, will be cutting 86 jobs at its facility on John Street in Henrietta.

That’s according to a required notice filed with the New York State Labor Department. The notice says the reason for the layoffs is that some manufacturing activities are being moved to Missouri.

The 86 people are part of a 450-member workforce at that Henrietta operation.

Most of the layoffs will happen next March.

Alstom also has operations in Hornell.

The U.S. economy added 228,000 jobs in November, according to the monthly jobs report from the Bureau of Labor Statistics. The unemployment rate remained steady at 4.1 percent, unchanged from October.

"Employment growth has averaged 174,000 per month thus far this year, compared with an average monthly gain of 187,000 in 2016," the agency's acting Commissioner William J. Wiatrowski said of the report.

Two University of Rochester professors are among Time Magazine's Persons of the Year.

Time calls them the "silence breakers," women who have voiced allegations of sexual assault and harassment by dozens of high-profile men in entertainment, media, business and sports.

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U.S. Photonics Hub Coming To Rochester

What does this mean for the economy of the Rochester region?