New York Gov. Andrew Cuomo, who has instituted a minimum wage increase for most workers in the state, now wants to extend that rate to tipped workers, including wait staff and car washers. That news is causing a backlash from restaurant owners and small business groups.

The current state minimum wage for tipped workers is $7.50 an hour. That’s lower than the minimum wage for non-tipped workers, which ranges from $9.70 an hour upstate in some industries to $12 an hour for fast-food workers in New York City.

One of Western New York's most powerful business and civic leaders has died. Robert G. Wilmers, the CEO and chairman of M&T Bank, died unexpectedly Saturday night in New York City.


A coalition of area labor leaders and restaurant workers will be holding a press conference Monday to denounce the proposed federal regulation allowing employers to control workers' tips.

Zakary Skinner is a local restaurant worker said the issue isn’t with pooled tipping, which he believes isn’t necessarily a bad practice; its the idea that tips would be distributed at an owners discretion.

"Right now there is at least some process where we have control over those tips so we have a right to those tips. And this will kind of put it up to the employers."

With a projected multibillion-dollar deficit and looming federal changes that could cost the state billions more, the biggest obstacle in the upcoming 2018 legislative session will be balancing the state budget.

The second-highest-ranking Republican in the Senate, John DeFrancisco, said the budget will be “horrible” and the worst in at least seven years.

“I think it’s going to be very, very difficult,” DeFrancisco said. “Probably the most difficult budget year the governor has had since he’s been governor.” 

U.S. retailers are looking forward to a strong holiday season this year after new numbers show higher than expected sales for November.

The Commerce Department said Thursday that retail and food sales were up 5.8 percent last month over November 2016, according to advance estimates. And, sales were up a seasonally adjusted 0.8 percent from October of this year.

Updated at 3:27 p.m. ET

After a brief security evacuation, U.S. telecom regulators have voted to repeal so-called net neutrality rules, which restrict the power of Internet service providers to influence loading speeds for specific websites or apps.

After weeks of heated controversy and protests, the Republican majority of the Federal Communications Commission voted along party lines on Thursday to loosen Obama-era regulations for Internet providers.

(WXXI News & AP) Communities in New York state are splitting $755 million in state economic development funding.

State officials announced the awards Wednesday at an event in Albany. The money will support hundreds of local economic development efforts, including job training, subsidies for expanding businesses and funding for community organizations.

This year's big winners include central New York, the Mohawk Valley, the Albany region, the mid-Hudson Valley and Long Island, which each received more than $80 million.

RIT officials say an alum of the university has just given them $50 million, the largest donation ever made to that institution.

Austin McChord is a 32 year old, 2009 graduate of RIT, who started a company called Datto. That’s a Connecticut-based data protection company that also employs about 200 people in downtown Rochester.

McChord is also an RIT trustee, and he says he started his company in 2007 with an idea he had while he was a student.

After seeing his grandmother burn herself on a toaster, Andrew Young had an idea. It led to an invention - the "Toaster Shooter." It's now a $250,000 winner.

14-year-old Andrew Young from Batavia was announced as the winner of the Frito-Lay "Dreamvention" contest for his toaster that shoots toast into the air and onto your plate. Young beat out four other teen inventors from across the country.

The toaster is tilted to the side and has bigger springs, so when your toast is done it shoots into the air and falls onto your plate.

There may be some big changes on the way for Xerox’s Board of Directors.

The word came early Monday with Xerox announcing that Jonathan Christodoro, a board member who was originally appointed by activist investor Carl Icahn, is resigning. Christodoro is making that move so that he can join a slate of three other Icahn-backed nominees to run for the Xerox board next year.

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U.S. Photonics Hub Coming To Rochester

What does this mean for the economy of the Rochester region?