medical marijuana

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High out-of-pocket costs may prove to be an insurmountable obstacle for patients seeking medical marijuana. While the treatment has been legalized, the state has not set a price for it, and insurance companies will not be covering it. 

As a result, people like Angel won't have access.

"My story is a long story."

SOLVEJG WASTVEDT/WSKG NEWS

 

Winners of New York’s five medical marijuana licenses could emerge any day now. The state Department of Health says it will announce the picks in mid-July. One bidder, Salus Scientific, aims to start growing in Johnson City.

If the company wins a license, it will have to get right down to business. Co-founder Michael Falcone says he plans to refurbish a former grocery warehouse in the city to use for cultivation. The drug would need to be ready for sale by January, according to state rules.

BLOGS.KQED.ORG

 

This week in our latest Innovation Trail report, Jenna Flanagan visits one downstate company hoping to grow and distribute medical marijuana after the state passed legislation allowing it last year.

New York's decision has companies from all over the country (let alone the state) trying to get one of the five licenses the state will grant this summer.  The Department of Health wants the facilities, once they're named, to be up and running by January 2016. Video preview after the jump.

 

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Marijuana has been approved in New York for medicinal uses for people with certain ailments, but that doesn’t mean using it will be simple.

It’s a bit of a going-nowhere-fast loop when it comes to health insurance providers offering coverage for medicinal marijuana.

While medical marijuana will soon be legal for some illnesses in New York, legal experts are warning there are some unanswered concerns over when and where it can be used.

In about a year and a half, people with illnesses like cancer or AIDS will be able to use medicinal marijuana legally for pain and loss of appetite.

But will those patients be allowed to be high in the workplace?

Labor attorney Michael Macomber, with the firm Tully Rinckey, says marijuana is still an illegal drug at the federal level after all.

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