manufacturing

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The Connecticut-based helicopter maker Sikorsky announced on Monday that it will close its Southern Tier plant at the end of the year.

In a statement, company spokesman Paul Jackson says planned cutbacks at the Pentagon were the reason for the closure:

Due to declining defense budgets and the continuing economic weakness in many markets, Sikorsky yesterday informed employees of its intent to close the Sikorsky Military Completions Center (SMCC) in Horseheads as of December 31, 2012, and transition the work to our West Palm Beach, Fla., facility. 

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It's the Thursday Innovation Trail Mix and as usual plenty is happening on our round.

The Pew Research Center says the middle class continues to fall behind.

Cuomo will be dodging fracking protestors at the State Fair today.

What's a Manufacturing Innovation Institute?

A year after the flood, Binghamton University is living large in downtown.

Ryan Delaney / WRVO

The governor said he had trouble following along with all the new technology on display at Cooper Crouse-Hinds in Syracuse, but he was certainly impressed.

Gov. Andrew Cuomo was given a close-up look at a new laboratory paid for with state aid at the 115 year old lighting manufacturer Friday.

Crouse-Hinds, which got its start making simpler devices like traffic lights, now makes lighting and electrical equipment suitable for harsh and hazardous environments.

In December, it won a $300,000 Excelsior tax credit from the Empire State Development Corp to renovate part of its site and put in the new lab.

Unemployment figures for May come out Friday. While the numbers will show how many jobs have been added or lost, they won't tell us much about the quality of positions filled or illustrate what economists already know: that the middle of the job market is hollowing out.

Ryan Delaney / WRVO

Candles are again being made at a Syracuse factory that had made them for almost 100 years.

Three years after Will & Baumer closed up shop and moved its candle-making operation to Tennessee, a new manufacturer of devotional candles has taken over the old plant.

The new company - Light 4 Life Candles - is headed up by former Will & Baumer president Marshall Ciccone.

Ciccone and other company officials held a ribbon cutting ceremony Thursday.

"It's just very, very heartening to see kind of a new start," Ciccone said after the ceremony. "A new company, but doing the same kind of thing."

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