infrastructure

Here's how we can fix New York's aging infrastructure

Apr 27, 2015
yellr.net

Yes the state’s roads and bridges are in a mess, and at the moment we can’t afford to replace them. The Cuomo administration has yet to explain the details of how it’ll fund the new Hudson River Crossing. A recent report from the transport research group TRIP found that nearly 40% of New York State’s bridges are either structurally deficient or obsolete. 

A sharply divided city argues over whether to keep a major transit link running through downtown, or to route it around the outskirts of town.

It’s nearly the same debate going on today, but this was in the 1920s. Then, Syracuse was arguing over whether to build an elevated rail corridor through downtown, as Dennis Connors, curator of the Onondaga Historical Association explains.

Matt Richmond/WSKG News

 

New York State is in the middle of dramatic changes to its energy system. Anoverhaul of its electric grid is moving forward. And intense opposition meets every new infrastructure project proposed by the fossil fuel industry. Two public events in the Southern Tier yesterday illustrate the slow move toward a new energy system.

A group of architects and urban developers favoring the removal of the interstate through downtown Syracuse are out with a drawing of what the city could look like if the roadway was gone.

The group, ReThink 81, is making the argument that tearing down the elevated highway would make room for economic growth, where currently the roadway creates a gap in economic vitality between downtown and University Hill. The highway bisects those two neighborhoods.

http://www.panynj.gov/airports/laguardia.html

Governor Cuomo continued the roll out of his 2015 agenda Tuesday with details of an infrastructure plan that includes upgrading New York City region airports to providing broadband for upstate rural areas. The governor also offered clues to another key item- education, where he seems determined to take on the status quo.

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