higher ed

Stephen Sartori / Say Yes to Education

Non-profit education initiative Say Yes to Education marked five years in the Syracuse school district by touting increases in college enrollment and adding some top schools to the program.

Say Yes entered Syracuse schools in 2009 with the goal of overhauling urban education and increasing the city's chronically poor graduation rates. Syracuse was the first city-wide implementation of the program.

A group of central New York public colleges is among the winners of the governor's second round of the SUNY 2020 Challenge Grant program.

The state's College of Environmental Science and Forestry, Upstate Medical University and Onondaga Community College in Syracuse and SUNY Oswego teamed up for the program.

They were awarded $15 million to start an institute of environmental health and medicine.

The unemployment rate for recent high school graduates has nearly doubled since the recession began, leaving almost a third of them without work, according to a report from an economic think tank.

A new report by the Economic Policy Institute found that 29.5 percent of recent high school graduates that aren't going on to college don't have a full time job. That's up from 17.5 percent in 2007, before the recession began.

It won't be a physical structure like some incubators. And it won't be trying to churn out startup businesses. Instead the incubator SUNY Oswego is launching this month will try to create an "innovation ecosystem."

The Thrive program will try and develop a new blueprint for Oswego's future, says Jeff Grimshaw, the director of business and community relations at SUNY Oswego. He notes that if new businesses were another outcome of the incubator, that would be a positive.

But the bigger goal is community engagement.

deanmeyersnet / via Flickr

High paying jobs will remain elusive for the class of 2013 as a slow economic recovery drags on, according to numbers tallied by an economic policy center.

The Economic Policy Institute crunched some data compiled by the Bureau of Labor Statistics and found starting salaries for 21-24-year old demographic entering the labor force continues to be lower than it was a a decade ago.