Higher Ed

Higher education stories from across upstate New York.


Second year college student, Valerie Hacker, has lost more than 200 course credits that she will never get back. Her hopes for a brighter future vanished last April after Corinthian Colleges, Inc. abruptly announced it would close all remaining Everest Institute locations across the country.

"I had to leave school early on a Tuesday because my father had fallen down and died of a heart attack while I was in class. Saturday I get the email saying that Everest is closing, so I’m like, 'You gotta be kidding me!'" says Hacker.

U.S. Senator Kirsten Gillibrand is proposing a federal bill to lend more assistance to campus sexual assaults.  WBFO's Focus on Education Reporter Eileen Buckley asked her about how it would assist college students.

The education programs that serve New York’s prison population are streamlining the path to a college degree. Private organizations offer college classes in 19 state facilities. Now several of the groups have formed a consortium to help students make it to graduation day.

In the past, transfer to a new prison often meant the end of an education for people working on their degrees. Many facilities don’t offer college programs. And even if they do, there are uncertainties: Will credits transfer? Are spots in the program open?


Cornell University’s Prison Education Program is very selective. Interested inmates take a test, and only about 10 percent get in. The program has to stay small because its budget comes only from donations.

Credit Kenneth Buker/via Flickr



Learning a new language is tough. And for immigrant farmworkers, long work days and lack of transportation can pose extra barriers. New York state has an idea to change that. It’s a language lesson that fits in your pocket. Just dial up the state’s new English on the Go line from your cell phone. The free lessons are interactive, with audio and text messages.