alternative energy

Instead of leaving leftovers to rot, why don't we turn them into electricity?

Apr 6, 2016
Luke Runyon/Harvest Public Media

Food waste is an expensive problem. The average U.S. family puts upward of $2,000 worth of food in the garbage every year.

What some see as a problem, however, others see as a business opportunity. A new facility, known as the Heartland Biogas Project, promises to take wasted food from Colorado’s Front Range and turn it into electricity.

Making energy from waste: the other natural gas

Feb 17, 2016
Rebecca Jacobson / Inside Energy

Every day, a facility on the outskirts of Grand Junction, Colorado, takes in 8 million gallons of what people have flushed down their toilets and washed down their sinks. The water coming out the other end of the Persigo Wastewater Treatment Plant is cleaner than the Colorado River it flows into.

The organic solids strained from that water are now serving a new purpose -- producing fuel for city vehicles.

WATCH: Growing greener pot in greenhouses

Feb 5, 2016
Dan Boyce

Colorado's booming pot industry is draining the state's electric grid. In Pueblo, one grower is looking to the sun for a solution.

Using greenhouses could cut down on the enormous light fixtures needed to grow marijuana indoors.

Dan Boyce of Inside Energy, a collaborative journalism initiative among public media and an Innovation Trail partner, has more on the green future of pot. 

Ryan Delaney / WRVO

There’s a handful of machines in this corner of the massive Intertek testing facility in Cortland. They’re all designed to make sure solar energy panels can withstand being outside for decades, enduring rain, snow and even hail.

Rick Lewandowski, the executive director of the Center for Clean Energy Technology, shows an older solar panel that didn’t pass their test.

License Some rights reserved by muora / Creative Commons License

Governor Cuomo’s state of the state address saw a significant push for the reduction of greenhouse gas emissions, and the implementation of smart grid technology.

Speaking about the state’s need to be better prepared for disasters of the magnitude of Superstorm Sandy, Cuomo pointed more reliable power source as one of the major requirements.