Matt Richmond

Matt Richmond comes to Binghamton's WSKG, a WRVO partner station in the Innovation Trail consortium, from South Sudan, where he worked as a stringer for Bloomberg, and freelanced for Radio France International, Voice of America, and German Press Agency dpa.  He has worked with KQED in Los Angeles, Cape Times in Cape Town, South Africa, and served in the Peace Corps in Cameroon.  Matt's masters in journalism is from the Annenberg School for Communication at USC.

Starting as early as the end of the summer, all officers in the City of Ithaca Police Department are going to wear body cameras. City of Ithaca Police Chief John Barber presented the department’s camera policy to common council members earlier this month. The policy includes rules for operating the cameras, storing the videos and releasing them to the public.

Jennifer Forbes works at the Southside Community Center, in a mostly African-American neighborhood in Ithaca. She says the cameras are a good idea if they lead to transparency.

 

Matt Richmond

 

 After about seven years of research, public hearings, rallies, elections and rumors that a decision was imminent, the final environmental impact statement on hydrofracking was released on Wednesday.

Its findings aren’t a surprise.

Back in 2012, the Department of Environmental Conservation asked the Department of Health to add a health review to its review. It was the final stage in preparing the report. And in December, the acting health department commissioner, Howard Zucker, famously said this about high volume hydraulic fracturing, or HVHF: 

 

New York’s Department of Environmental Conservation released the long-awaited final version of its environmental review of high volume hydraulic fracturing, or fracking. The final report includes the Department of Health's review of health risks. There’s also studies of spills and other incidents in Pennsylvania and the atmospheric effects of emissions from drilling operations.

Today is Cornell University’s 150th anniversary. Its charter was signed in Albany in 1865. One of the school’s founders, Ezra Cornell, was a farmer and made veterinary science a priority. This is the story of the career of the first doctor of veterinary medicine to graduate from Cornell.

Matt Richmond/WSKG News

For more than 10 years, New York’s Department of Environmental Conservation and IBM have been working to clean up chemical spills in the groundwater under Endicott. They’ve made progress on the part of the spill known as the “toxic plume.” According to a recent report issued by the DEC, 80 percent of the spill under homes south of the old IBM campus has been cleaned up.

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