Jenna Flanagan

Jenna first knew she was destined for a career in journalism after following the weekly reports of the Muppet News Flash as a child. In high school she wrote for her student newspaper and attended a journalism camp at SUNY New Paltz, her Hudson Valley hometown. Jenna then went on to study communications and journalism at Seton Hall University in South Orange, NJ where she earned her Bachelor of Arts.

In 1999, Jenna took her first job in the business as a Production Assistant for 1010WINS eventually working her way up to assistant editor. Working in a busy New York newsroom, she quickly learned what it takes to churn out a factual, engaging and newsworthy story on deadline.

From there she took her first on-air position at WBGO, Newark Public Radio and began a lifelong love of public broadcasting. After WBGO, Jenna spent 6 ½ years writing, reporting and producing All Things Considered for WNYC in New York City. Her work has also aired nationally on NPR.

Her television reports can be seen on WMHT's award-winning public affairs show, New York NOW, which airs on PBS stations statewide.

Innovation Trail reporter Jenna Flanagan takes us to Saugerties, Ulster County, which landed on state Comptroller Thomas DiNapoli's list of municipalities experiencing fiscal stress.

Find out how towns like Saugerties are trying to make a comeback.

JENNA FLANAGAN/WMHT

Saying the proposed pipelines are all one system, just like the nation's rivers or even our arteries, activists from across the Northeast gathered on the east steps of New York’s State Capitol to protest the expansion of natural gas pipelines.

The environmental rally in Albany demanded that Gov. Andrew Cuomo not sign the 401 water quality certificate currently sitting on his desk. It would allow the Constitution Pipeline to be built.

Jenna Flanagan, WMHT

Throughout the first half of the 20th century, African-Americans began moving out of the South to cities in northern states like New York in search of a better life, a period known as the Great Migration.

It coincided with the proliferation of American car culture and eventually the interstate highway system.

WMHT

It’s something most of us take for granted. You turn on the tap, fill a glass of water and have a nice refreshing drink.

But what if that water has been deemed too contaminated to consume? That’s something residents of the Rensselaer County village of Hoosick Falls are confronted with as they try to determine how to move forward and make their water drinkable again.

“We’ve always seemed to have a higher incident of cancer here than other places.”

Jenna Flanagan / WMHT

Ahead of the upcoming Paris Climate Change Conference, Hudson Valley Environmentalists invited the public to join them in a public stance against climate change on the Walkway over the Hudson.

The former railroad turned pedestrian bridge spans the Hudson from Ulster to Dutchess counties. It’s now a state park and for New Paltz Climate Action Coalition, the perfect place to engage the public.

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