There are plenty of political and other controversies to keep people busy on social media. But for at least a few days this week, one of the biggest trending disputes has to do with what you think you heard.

You may have already had this argument with your co-workers, when you heard a brief audio clip of a computerized voice that sounds like it’s saying either, “laurel“  or  “yanny.”

It’s not as simple as you think; different people have heard different things.

Especially if they heard the word played at either a slower speed or a faster speed.

A prominent local developer is speaking out about a federal investigation into his business.

Morgan Communities CEO Robert Morgan wasn't speaking on Monday when federal agents raided his offices in Pittsford.

But he issued a statement late Wednesday saying he's cooperating with a federal inquiry.

Morgan says the investigation has to do with federally backed loans placed to several developers through a specific mortgage broker.

Xerox has officially appointed John Visentin as CEO and set July 31st as the date for the annual meeting. There is no word yet on a location for that meeting.

The company released more information about its next moves on Wednesday night.  Earlier this week, Xerox announced that Visentin would become CEO and that Jeff Jacobson and five other board members would resign as part of a settlement with activist investors, Carl Icahn and Darwin Deason.

Xerox has been through some tumultuous times in recent weeks with questions over who will end up controlling the company. And with the recent announcement there will be a new CEO and several new board members, a retirees group is wondering what it will mean for their members.

David Coriale is president of the Association of Retired Xerox Employees, a national group which represents some Xerox retirees across the country.  He says there are about 10,000 Xerox retirees in the Rochester area.

Erie County District Attorney John Flynn says new research at the University at Buffalo is a "huge deal" in developing a computer chip that could eventually be used to build the illegal drug equivalent of the breathalyzer.


Various reports indicate that FBI agents raided the Pittsford offices of local developer Robert Morgan on Monday morning.

An FBI spokeswoman said that agents were “conducting court-authorized activity” at 1080 Pittsford-Victor Road, but could not comment beyond that.

That location is the headquarters of Morgan Management and CEO Robert Morgan.

The raids follow a report in the Buffalo News last fall that FBI agents were examining financial transactions by his companies

There are major developments in the battle for control of Xerox, as the company announced management changes and that it will pull out of a deal that would have seen Fuji acquiring Xerox.

Plus, two local spirits companies announce plans to expand; one of them in South Bristol will grow crops needed for its products and another will expand a tasting room in Fairport.

A Canadian company is opening up an office in Rochester that is expected to add up to 43 jobs over the next five years.

The company is BizXL Solutions, a management consulting firm based in Toronto. They already have an office in New York City, but will make their North Clinton Avenue location in Rochester the company’s U.S. headquarters.

Empire State Development is helping with up to $700,000 through the Excelsior Jobs Tax Credit initiative in exchange for job creation commitments. 

The on-again, off-again agreement between Xerox and two major investors to settle a proxy fight is on-again.

On Sunday evening, Xerox announced that it has ended a proposed $6.1 billion dollar deal that would have seen Fujifilm take control of Xerox, and has reached a settlement with activist investors Carl Icahn and Darwin Deason.

As part of the agreement, Xerox says that CEO Jeff Jacobson has resigned along five members of the Board of Directors including Board Chairman Robert Keegan. Keith Cozza is expected to be named Chairman of the Board.

A team of students at RIT has come up with a new way to send out mass notifications on campus in the event of an emergency.

Their digital clock can receive digital alerts to display on the screen when emergency coordinators have to reach students, staff, and campus visitors in a hurry.

Tyler Krupicka is one of the computer engineering students who developed the prototype. He says the device, called Clockwyse, can be made using consumer tablets and PCs.  Mounted on the wall in a classroom or common area, it simply displays the time, until there's an emergency.

Pages

U.S. Photonics Hub Coming To Rochester

What does this mean for the economy of the Rochester region?